How To Replace A Failing SVM Disk

Before you replace (what you believe is) a failing Solaris Volume Manager (SVM) disk, you need to establish whether it is still in fact in the process of failing or it has already failed. Why is it important to determine if an SVM disk has failed? It could save you a little time replacing a failed SVM disk as opposed to a failing one.

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11 comments - What do you think?  Posted by Ariel Giron - 28 February 2011 at 1:06 pm

Categories: Disk   Tags: , , , ,

How To Tell The Difference Between A Failed Disk And A Failing Disk

Why is it important to distinguish between a failed disk and one that is still in the process of failing? Because knowing if a disk has failed may save you a few steps when it's time to replace it.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Ariel Giron - at 12:39 pm

Categories: Disk   Tags: , , , , ,

How To Replace A Failed SVM Disk

Before you replace (what you believe is) a failed Solaris Volume Manager (SVM) disk, you need to establish whether it has indeed failed or is still in the process of failing. Why is it important to determine if an SVM disk has failed? It could save you a little time replacing a failed SVM disk as opposed to a failing one.

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13 comments - What do you think?  Posted by Ariel Giron - 25 February 2011 at 3:59 pm

Categories: Disk   Tags: , , , ,

How To Aggregate Network Interfaces

This article describes how to aggregate network interfaces using just two Solaris commands, dladm and ifconfig. Alright, three if you count vi. It also provides several examples of bringing up aggregated network interfaces and making the configuration of aggregate network interfaces persist across reboots.

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1 comment - What do you think?  Posted by Ariel Giron - 15 February 2011 at 10:50 pm

Categories: Network   Tags: ,

How To Reset The ALOM Password On A Sun Fire T1000 Or T2000

If an ALOM password reset is required on a Sun Fire T1000 or Sun Fire T2000 in case the password is lost or forgotten, the following steps can be taken to erase the ALOM NVRAM so that a user can gain access to it, set a new password and restore the NVRAM settings.

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8 comments - What do you think?  Posted by Ariel Giron - 26 January 2011 at 4:41 pm

Categories: System Controller   Tags: , ,

Like Sticking Wallpaper To A Waterfall

How many times have you sat there a look of intense concentration etched on your face willing that Solaris command to come while a blank screen mocked you? How many times have you cursed a wall, kicked a chair or grabbed at your hair in frustration while that Solaris command danced tantalizingly just out of your brain’s reach? Once? Twice? Half a dozen times?

In my case, it’s more times than I care to remember. It has happened so many times, in fact,¬†that I’ve simply stopped counting. I don’t know. Maybe it’s nerves, an inability to organize my thoughts or just plain bad memory. But remembering some Solaris commands is like sticking wallpaper to a waterfall. You can try as many times as you like but it just won’t stay up there.

It doesn’t help that a typical admin’s arsenal of Solaris commands is made up of only 20% that he or she uses 80% of the time. Stuff like ls, pwd, ps, who and the like. But it’s the rest of the iceberg, that 80% that only comes into play the remaining 20% of the time and usually during pressure-packed situations, that has always had me stumped.

So after one too many episodes of wall cursing, chair kicking and hair grabbing I decided that I must bring my misery to an end. I resolved that I will put these Solaris commands in a safe place. A place where each command lived in its own tiny pigeon hole just waiting to be called to action. A blog, yes. A technical one. And that’s how Solaris Commands came to be.

 

5 comments - What do you think?  Posted by Ariel Giron - 1 January 2011 at 1:01 am

Categories: Uncategorized   Tags:

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